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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 412 (some duplicates have been removed)
president al gore talking about hurricane katrina in his 2006 academy winning documentary, an inconvenient truth. the movie for those of you who have not seen it, warns us that due to climate change, we will experience many more super storms like sandy which forecasters say was the largest hurricane in atlantic history. climate change deniers will say the weather has always been weird. here are some inconvenient truths that they may want to consider. in the 1970s, there were just an average of under eight named storms per year. named storms like the a b c. in the 198hehe ample w ju ju u uerer nine ---- the average was just under nine per year. in the 1990s, it was about 11 named storms per year. in the 2000s it jumped to nearly 15 storms a year and get this, in the first three years of this decade, 2010, 2011, 2012 the average is just under 19. specifically, we had 19 named storms in 2010. we had 18 in 2011 and so far we've had 19 named storms and there is an entire month left in hurricane season this year
at $46 billion. of course this will be about half of katrina's damage. and of course we know what katrina today and especially the new orleans area. so this is rare territory. and this was a category 1. at one time katrina a category 5. 3 at landfall. so just shows you what happens. even if it's a category 1, if you go in to a very populated area of the country is where this storm made landfall and that's why these numbers are astronomical for on the insurance industry. the loss is just insane. so the storm still lingers today. the damage is all done. a lot of the heavy snow is just about overwith. west virginia, some areas got two to three feet of snow. it remains kind of stuck, though, because the weather pattern that enabled this storm to come at us from the ocean, from the unusual direction, the high pressure, the blocking responsible for this mess is still sitting off the coast. it will take two or three days for the storm to slowly weaken and head up in to canada, but it's a cold morning for everyone without power. there is some of that snow still left over in the mountains of west
fugate to do that and signed off on jeb bush to do this, there was this hangover from katrina going back in the bush administration and there's always been a point of emphasis, if you will, on fema by the obama administration. i think frankly it won't have mattered who came into the presidency in the post katrina world there was going to be an emphasis on fema. you weren't going to let that get politicized. yes, it's a political appointee and you're going to have somebody who came with a background to do this stuff. so i think that they realize that it's a high-wire act, this emergency management business. and most of the time if you do a good job it's good politics. if you blow it, it's really bad politics. >> i agree. >> it can be unrecoverable politics. so this is a case where good politics and good public policy and good management all converge. it's good politics to do a good job. you're not playing one side against the other. >> you know, i've always thought that the democrats being the government party because they believe in government more than republicans owe a greater debt, a
overseas and with hurricane katrina down in new orleans, and they say it does not look much different. walking around and having it be dead silent and hearing the hissing of natural gas coming out of the ground, we are still as of yesterday in search and rescue mode to be sure everyone is out of their house and safe before they allow people to come back. it is a very frustrating time. i can tell you what he was talking about on the earlier call, i had the opportunity last night to talk to some people in the shelters and they are amazed at the amount of people willing to help, total strangers. random citizens donating goods to try to help their fellow man. it is unfortunate it takes a tragic event like this to bring the best out of people. host: what is the best way the federal government can help your district? guest: first of all, the president has been doing everything he needed to do along with the governor in giving the governor of the tools that we need here in new jersey to get this process started. it is going to be a multi-year process to get us headed back in the right direct
costs will surpass those from hurricanes irene and katrina. although there are countless businesses hurt, others could see a boost. erika miller reports. >> reporter: when you consider the massive amounts of flooding, downed trees, and damage to transportation networks, it could take days-- if not weeks, to tally up the financial costs from the storm. but already there are predictions sandy will be the most expensive clean-up in u.s. history. the most serious damage appears to be caused by flooding along the east coast. according to economic tracking firm i.h.s. global insight, property damage will likely surpass $20 billion. add to that as much as $30 billion in lost business, and the total financial toll could end up being close to $50 billion. hotels, stores, airlines, and restaurants have lost business they wot get back. insurance companies will have to make big payouts, which will likely mean higher insurance premiums for customers down the road. here in new york city, commerce has been crippled. and power is not expected to be restored in many areas until next week. i.h.s. global p
after 9/11, thousands of people with the opposite of katrina because fema had control. giving up on individuals helping neighbors, local government, that is a serious problem and why we are bankrupt. all the money that will go out, there is no money in the paint and -- bank so they will just borrow and print and centralize the power to be in washington dc part of that is bureaucratic and in sufficient. john: thank you for all you have done to wake people up. but i fear we will not have much convince -- success convincing people we don't need fema. even though government fails part instinct leads us to assume washington has the best. they don't. they fail all the time. fema fails constantly. after hurricane hugo one senator called it bureaucratic jackasses to get the hell out of the way. they said prove it but after hurricane andrew even in your times reported it is unclear who was in charge of the relief ever. mikulski said the response was seen as a disaster itself. they said they would fix it then came hurricane katrina and nobles to thousand people died. fema often got in the
hurricane katrina under george w. bush, it was an absolute disaster because the guys don't believe in government. so when you put them in charge of government, they do a horrible job. that shouldn't be surprising. now, romney and ryan say oh, no, it's okay. even if we're going to cut it by 40%, a romney-ryan administration will always ensure that disaster funding is there for those in need. period. now, isn't that great? that's just basically the same old romney-ryan lie. i'm going to cut it by 40% but it will be exactly the same. no it won't! you'll cut it by 40%. it will be a disaster, literally! and then we turn to noaa's analysis in 2011 of what the cuts would do. they say without data from the satellite closest to the end of its shelf life, the accuracy of its forecasts for major storms like blizzards and hurricanes would be decreased by approximately 50%. and that's not just hey i can't tell what the weather's going to be like or i can't exactly tell where the storm's going to hit. it has ramifications.
kind of initial reaction we got after katrina, 2005. i'm not, again not comparing the gravity of the two event but i am comparing the immediate official response over the handling of these events. what i'm also noting is the distinct difference in the media coverage of 2005 versus this storm in 2012. whether it will be an issue a few days from now. pat? >> it could be. what we are seeing, now that the mayor's moment of let them eat cake pass, with the marathon and by the way, i have yet to see him in staten island. >> he has not been there yet. >> doesn't it tell you everything, the people you interviewed said. there is a political effort to run the clock out. with the media, like they've done on libya. just like they've hidden the truth about libya, hide the truth about this in the service of obama's campaign. let's get it straight. >> fox was the first camera crew to go to staten island to show this and others in the media have gone. you can't ignore it. >> there is a disconnect, the politician want to say everything is okay. rereality is this afternoon. what will they do, h
it will be sold for a plot of property on the beach. >> did we learn enough from katrina? it seems that people did evacuate, but we didn't have the same problems post-katrina that we did last time in terms of people getting to safety ahead of the storm. from your observation, do you think that's accurate? >> i think all of our professional forecasters -- boy, did they get the right. a week out, they knew this tropical system was going to explode, the way it did take this left hook into new jersey. it has been katrina-esque. the man holding the camera, dwyane scott, was with me in new orleans overnight for that storm. for weeks thereafter, we've been talking about it nonstop today. we may have to rethink some of our shoreline rules and definitions. we've got governors of three states, christie, malloy, cuomo, those three states are talking about a new shoreline and maybe a new normal. maybe we need our folks at the weather channel to tell us, is this a 200-year storm or the start of 200 years worth of storms like this. >> is there a spirit of rebuilding here? do you hear frit the locals? have you b
andrew and katrina. welcome, mr. dan tony. how do you think this storm is going to rank as compared with the biggest storm ever, which was katrina, in terms of insured losses, and andrew? >> well, katrina was an $80 billion insurance convenient, not take nothing consideration the economic impact as well. and a much different type of storm. the biggest problem with sandy it is a densely populated area of the country. early on in the claims process, i believe that the estimates of $20 billion range could be close. then you also have to look at the economic impact with the new york stock exchange being closed for two days, quite a few petroleum refineries shutdown along the east coast that could have an effect, as you had in an earlier broadcast that the airlines -- >> talk me -- >> thousands of flights. >> let's say i'm a small business owner, i own a pizza shop on the jersey shore or i own a dry cleaner out in queens that was damaged, what typically is covered under my business policy that i carry and what suspect? if it's flooding is it covered? >> unfortunately, flooding is an addi
the state government do. what does a state government do? i ask that at the time of louisiana with katrina and the answer is not a whole lot. >> brandon, i just want to ask what good was fema during katrina? >> well, it was not good but it has done a better job here. you saw the governor praising and this is not a time of politics but a time to get it right and to respond to people's needs. the reason that the federal government needs help is because they can't afford it. >> they can't afford it. well, new york and new jersey have you seen their sell's tax. what do they do with all the money? they waste it. >> that's your governor. >> yeah, ours and both parties. look at fema. you know one reason that we keep fema, they make so much millions and billions get tossed in and those companies all have contracts and make a fortune and they need to keep fema. >> i hope that romney takes the tack that jack did. >> jack, how hard is it on mitt romney this day when chris is raving at how bam has been. >> well, chris christie, does not want romney to win. it's in his interest for obama to win. the in
airlines to talk about the impact on the industry and the man who led fema during hurricane katrina will tell us what the federal emergency agency should expect from this storm. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use, it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. you have to dig a little. fidelity's etf market tracker shows you the big picture on how different asset classes are performing, and it lets you go in for a closer look at areas within a class or sector that may be bucking a larger trend. i'm stephen hett of fidelity investments. the etf market tracker is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. get 200 free trades today and explore your next investing idea. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. >> we talked
it was obama's katrina, which it is. the jobs report is up. we will check in with karl rove and look at predictions from others as the outcome of tuesday is now pretty much at hand. joining me with reaction to all of this, radio talk show host willie billy cunningham. his radio show is heard nationally across the country on sunday nights. sir, welcome back. ju you are a great american. >> sean hannity, how are you? >> sean: after the photo op,. billy cunningham where does president obama fly? to vegas. meanwhile, it it is beginning to freeze in the northeast. people don't have heat, electricity. the gas stations that are open people are waiting six hours or long are to be able to get gas. he comes to town. he hugs chris christie, photo op and then heads off to vegas. your reaction? >> i would say a few things. number one, i think this is obama's katrina in which he is showing a complete lack of compassion. i can recall a speech he gave in denver in front of 70,000 fans in which he said if you elect me the winds will stop blowing and the oceans will not rise. what happened to the anoi
hurricane sandy that is hitting us now. better be prepared as we learned from hurricane katrina. not if you listen to the ryan-romney budget. we give them every benefit of the doubt on discretionary spending for the government. they don't specify, of course, because they're cowards. they don't say i'm going to cut this program this program this program. let's assume they do not cut fema any more than they would cut any other program. what would the fema budget under the ryan plan? well, it would be about $3.9 billion. let me did oh some quick math for you guys. that is $10 billion less from $13.5 billion to $4 billion. well, ryan is an extremist. that's not fair to look at his. let's look at romney's budget proposals stretching through 2015. what would he cut it down to? less $1.8 billion. it's even worse than ryan's budget. so if you are interested in getting a proper response through fema to these storms apparently you're not going to get one if ryan and romney get their wishes and desires and cut the hell out of our budget. this is a good time to be doing that. is that a smart move? and
to start rebuilding. up next we have an expert from katrina. >> another look at the damage and devastation after sandy. >> it is now quarter past the hour. it is now just a pile of broken concrete. peter doocy has been down there the past few days. he is in delaware to tell us a little bit about the situation the there>> >> 8.1 million people are still without power. that will be something that continues to be a problem as the days go on. right now it is cold outside. it is 43-44 degrees here in delaware on the boardwalk f. you don't have power you don't have any heat. boardwalk is a little bit sandy different stories of the boardwalk is completely splintered in some cases. folks who are familiar with the boardwalk are not going to remember it or they are not going to recognize it when they go back to visit later on. residents know they are very lucky to have avoided that kind of devastation. >> we were very fortunate. we thank god that the storm went north of us. we never expected new york was going to get anything worse. the city came through much better than anything any of us could hav
the difference in philosophies. when there is a crisis in this country, as there was during hurricane katrina in 2005 or the economic crisis in 2008, 2009, republicans believe that you are on your own. that's what the republicans did during katrina, under the president bush administration, that's what they wanted to do when we had an economic crisis in october of '08. that's what they said to the auto industry when the auto industry was on the verge of bankruptcy. democrats, on the other hand, take a different point of view. rather than you are on your own, we have your back. it doesn't mean that the government is the answer to every problem. it doesn't mean the government is the bailout to every problem. it is the belief that the federal government players an important role as a partner in trying to get the country back on its feet when we hit a crisis. that's exactly what the democrats did with the economic crisis in '08 and '09 and that's exactly what you will see this administration doing during this crisis. the republican view is basically to let the states be on their own and to run eme
in and that mindset of dissolving governme government, then when you have katrina and you have the storm we get the kind of response we got then and a lot of people suffering and basically on our own. that is the scary part. all back to the fact that it will get worse and worse over time and more and more heated that you have heard the thought that it is time to act and do something and you can't count on government to save you. i live in new york and they could not help many people. 60 houses burned to the ground because how could you respond in three feet of water? host: are you referring it the fires in brooklyn? >> yes, breezy point. it is too much to be responded to by too few resources and there is no power, there is no pumps. it is just crazy. you say how much trust can you have in government? whether can government do to the extent that you have places inundated. you get the point. if it dealt with in a serious way which neither party is doing, it is a joke. they are a small group of voices who argue to muddy the water when it is clearly in favor of something is going on and you need to
repetitive. it dulls the ears. here he doesn't have to mention bush. it's in everyone's head. katrina is recalled with the im. talk about fema, people think about the bush legacy. and so, he doesn't have make those contrastic splits, never mind about mitt romney, that helps him because he's doing stuff and it's all out there without the effort. >> you get the unearned assist from michael brown coming out. >> we'll talk about brownie. >> you couldn't ask for that. you couldn't make that bet. >> but there's karen welcome. hi. >> welcome to the show. i want to say, it's not just the presidential thing. it's also -- there's incredibly moving -- let's not forget the human toll this storm's taken. >> absolutely. >> the images of the president consoling americans in the wake of this massive disaster are incredibly powerful images. and what you heard in the president, what you heard from the president on the stump just now was empathy, this sense that he is fighting for you, that you have a seat at the table, middle class, working class americans, that he is there for you. and that fundamenta
. >> eric: may i bring -- >> bob -- holdon. >> kimberly: by the way, what happened to bush and katrina? did they do the same thing? it's okay there, but not here. being politically expedient again? >> bob: there are 77 people dead. romney and his people talk about how obama was not prepared. >> greg: you talk about climate change. >> eric: let me do this. i'll bring this back to why i put the two things in the same segment, bob. here is why. we gave him $1 trillion. the administration $1 trillion to beef up the infrastructure. they spent $1 trillion making the grid. burying the grid underground so that every time it's 50-mile-per-hour wind we don't have half the country losing power. that would have been a good use of stimulus money. better use. >> bob: bury new jersey under the ground in four years? >> eric: let me put it this way. $1 trillion closer to getting it done. what did we get with the money we spent? >> kimberly: nothing. >> bob: republicans have to think of something besides sandy to make a case in the final four days. >> greg: that is the point. >> dana: romney did not. what he
. it is not katrina but we are a close second. >>shepard: any time your house is without power or full of water or on the ground you have your own private katrina. a lot of the people staying at your hotel which is not normal, they are from there. >>guest: yes, we own two hotel s in the same parking lot here so we have been here for ten years and we have opened up at the world trade center so we are used to disaster. no one realized how bad this is and on wednesday when we thought the people who are here if a couple of days would leave, we thought it would get better and it was not getting better, we called the marathon people and said we would not send our neighbors into the street and we are going to need to tell the marathon people they is to go someplace else. >>shepard: you are not the only one calling the marathon people. this is a cover of the "new york post" owned by the parent company saying abuse of power, with generators that will power tenths for the marathon folks. listen to what happened on fox business network, where we share resources. here is what happened: charlie gasparino sa
. we were calling it the katrina factor the other day. the bush administration, they're not terribly effective response to hurricane katrina shadowed the rest of the bush presidency. besides the huge humanitarian cost, which resulted, no president wants to be seen under responding to a storm. that, besides the fact that you want to safeguard the american public, would suggest there would be a big response from the obama administration. there is only so much to you in do. a storm like this in new york, that is something we have not seen for a long time. there is certainly the earth -- possibility for people to say, rightly or wrongly, that the federal government did not respond appropriately. i have not seen any signs that any major figure in the republican party is trying to do that. unlike when some people immediately decided that hurricane irene would be the obama katrina. a couple people, including newt gingrich, suggested a quick response this time was at odds with the respond." pose -- at odds with the response posed to the staff in benghazi, libya. we will have to wait to see w
katrina and during the hurricane. and that's going to be the big angle, i think. otherwise we all guess as to how it affects turnout for elections. and that can go either way. >> you know, dana, it seems as if the white house by the president going back this morning before doing that event in orlando, it's an acknowledgment of they made a mistake going down last night. it seemed like a good idea probably friday when they decided to do that, get down a little bit early, maybe they get something in, and then now wait a minute, woke up this morning, what are we doing here? >> it's one of those things, chuck, when you get to the moment of the crisis, it's obvious what you need to do. when you're planning ahead, the campaign people obviously want to squeeze one more event in before they know he has to come back to washington. it was a mistake. it's probably not going to hurt him in any significant way. it reinforces what clarence said, that the focus will be for the next several days on the president much more than governor romney. >> kim, governor romney does not have a full-time job right
-- for hurricane isaac and hurricane katrina seven years ago -- both hit, i want to point out here both hit during the week of the homosexual event called southern decadence in new orleans. >> this makes me a bad homo, but i have never even heard of southern decadence. >> it sounds cool. >> we let the straights in. >> i'm in. >> bill: how big of you. >> what it is is that we have a hot line to god, and we're pulling the strings behind the scenes. >> bill: i got it. you know zap him. there are four important ballot measures on the ballot this year, dealing with marriage equality, maryland maine, washington state is the -- well they are all big. >> yeah. >> bill: and then minnesota. what is the difference? >> minnesota's is a constitutional -- anti-gay constitution issue. that would ban it. the other ones are affirmative, right? to maryland and washington both passed in the state legislature marriage equal this year but then anti-gay folks got enough signatures to get enough signatures to put it on the ballot. in maine it was sort of a heart breaker. so everybody is real c
't know what he shot about. he hot his mouth about katrina and we have seen record low levels. andrew cuomo linked climate change to sandy yesterday. >> steve: a county plans to move forward with a gun tax. under the plan will be a $25 tax on the fire arms and a plan to tax bullets. but the board dropped that because it would be more than the costs of ammunition. >> giant tiger shark. maria, a black belt was swimming in maui. and the shark confronted her and she gave it a best punch in the nose. she got more than a hundred stitchos her hand and thigh. >> steve: that's what you are supposed to do. >> gretchen: a woman was told her bible shirt was offensive. they made her cover tup with a jacket. they say it violates election laws and the attorney said he wants an apology or there will be a lawsuit. >> steve: is the on the ballot there? >> that shirt is permissible. keep the shirt on. >> steve: 20 minutes before the top of the hour. navy seals outraged over what happened in benghazi posted this on facebook. but facebook took it down. doesn't that vialate people's use of free speech. the
all of this living through this for a second time is proof of how katrina changed the nation's psychology when it comes to storms. >> yes. >> how many lessons have been learned, dark days along the gulf coast in '05. see it playing out. closest thing to katrina since '05. you are seeing the country changed after the storm, even response on every level has changed as well. interesting to watch, yet again for sure. >> yeah. >> coming up next, images are almost too much for adults to comprehend. for children, the pictures from sandy could be downright heartbreaking and confusing. >> we'll show you what one familiar fuzzy face is doing to help them understand. ♪ we have all been assaulted by the sights and sound of hurricane sandy. they can be hard for an adult but overwhelming for a child. >> imagine what it is like for kids. gma anchor josh elliott has this story. >> reporter: we adults called it a super storm. amidst the ferocity of nature's wrath, it was just plain scary. how do you talk to kids about getting through the storm of the century. we got together with a panel of
, and that would make sandy among the most expensive. hurricane katrina, the price tag $108 billion. yes, and that was just in money terms, not in people terms. >> right now, we are going to go back to baltimore. are things getting worse? >> things are getting worse. people have been talking about this storm. is worse than it was last year, with i read, for example. we are dealing with some really cold temperatures. not only with the reagan, looking at the rain falling at a lamppost, i will tell you what. these winds have continued to pick up in the last hour. i want to give you a bit of detail. 311 is fully operational. they are asking you to call 311 if you have a cottage. -- an outage. we have got 2000 police officers. also, swift water rescue is in place. we do know that these conditions are going to get worse. we also know that housing inspectors are out and about. wherever you are right now, do not try to go anywhere. six shelters in baltimore city. the rain is starting to come down. we will continue to monitor things. >> thank you. >> the use of 911 versus 311. the mayor had remin
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 412 (some duplicates have been removed)